Datian


The artist Datian is a testament to the human spirit. Born in 1949 in Southern China, Datian endured the culrural revolution of the Communist regime where he was denied a formal education and forced to work as a farm laborer, carpenter, and puppet maker. Despite the hardships,Datian still yearned to pursue his life's passion in art, as his father, a Paris-educated painter and sculptor, once did.

So, Datian persevered in following his dreams and, finally, his golden break came in 1984 when he was awarded the silver and bronze medals for his paintings Life and Roots at the China National Fine Art Exhibition. This achievement accorded him national recognition as a master painter. With his place in the art world established, his work traveled to Moscow, London, New York, and Tokyo as part of the China Fine Art Museum exhibition.

Then, Datian won more public and critical notice in 1988 with his bold Old House paintings that combined two-dimensional, three-dimensional, real, and surreal elements. In 1989, emboldened by his success, he immigrated to the U.S. and staged one man shows in New York and London.

To commemorate the Year of the Horse in 1990, Datian painted the exquisite Horses series. It garnered acclaim and was eventually selected by the U.S. Olympic Organizing Committee as the basis for the 1992 U.S. Olympic Equestrian Team poster. He earned yet another artist appointment from the 1996 U.S. Olympic Committee. A number of his paintings and sculptures remain an integral part of the Olympic Games Museum.

Further, Datian's Bronze Urn, commemorating the Chinese Olympic Games, and four of his original paintings are fixtures in China's Fine Art Museum. His good fortune continues, as his designs of several public memorials and fountains in his birth land saw their completion.

Ultimately, Datian loves to convey the interplay between architecture and nature. He builds upon this passion with creative celebrations of abundance and luxury. The Dream Collection holds an audience captive with vibrant colors. These paintings are contemporary, yet classic; real and surreal; personal, though, universal; East meets West; most of all, they are filled with hope...